Upcoming Events

March 2018

8       Board Meeting- 
                ULNRD Office 3 PM CT

12       Soil Moisture Workshop- 

April 2018

12       Board Meeting- 
                ULNRD Office 3 PM CT

May 2018

28     Memorial Day- Office Closed








Successful 5th Annual ACE Camp

      From June 15th through June 18th, campers from across the state of Nebraska attended the fifth annual Adventure Camp about the Environment (ACE) at the State 4-H Camp near Halsey. The camp drew in 32 campers and included some previous campers, too. Many of the campers attended the camp through a scholarship from their local NRD.
      The educational camp focused on forestry, rangeland, water quality, soils and wildlife. Campers had the chance to get their hands dirty and experience nature in many activities, as well as fun time in the river, and building water rockets. The campers also participated in competition activities with outdoor cooking, fishing, a scavenger hunt, geocaching, and other games. This was a great opportunity for the campers to learn more about nature and the natural resources in our area.
      This year was the fifth year for the ACE Camp. In June of 2010, the first Adventure Camp about the Environment was held with a total of 55 campers from across the state. The ACE Camp Committee hopes to continue this camp for many more successful years. KNOP-TV News from North Platte captured a few moments from the camp on Monday and aired the story that evening and night.
      The camp was sponsored and organized by the Nebraska Natural Resources Districts (NRDs), the Nebraska Association of Resources Districts (NARD) and the Hooker County Turner Youth Initiative. Presenters from the NRD's, NRCS office, UNL extension office, and Nebraska Game and Parks also helped to make the ACE Camp a great learning experience for the kids. With the help from these sponsors, partners and presenters from year to year, ACE Camp beomes a huge success.
      Local ACE Camp Scholarship Recipients from the Upper Loup NRD were J. Russell McMillan of Milburn, Aubrey Schultis and Jared Schultis of Tryon, Hollianna Watson of North Platte, and Taylor Downing of Dunning.
      Adventure Camp about the Environment is an annual camp beginning the third week of June. For more information about the camp you can look under the Education Tab, then click on Camps & Scholarships.


Recycle Update

From MDK Zero Landfill—From January 1 to March 31, 2014, the Upper Loup NRD has recycled 42,980 pounds of materials with MDK. This amount of materials has impacted the environment in multiple ways. The below illustration demonstrated the positive outcomes that originated from our recycling efforts with MDK.


Upper Loup NRD Received Grant from Nebraska Environmental Trust

April 5, 2014 —Upper Loup Natural Resources District announced today that it will receive $30,000 from the Nebraska Environmental Trust for the “No-Till Drill” project. The Trust Board announced funding for the project at its meeting on April 3, 2014 in Lincoln. The project is one of the 132 projects receiving $21,750,000 in grant awards from the Nebraska Environmental Trust this year. Of these, 56 were new applications and 76 are carry-over projects.

There are many benefits of using a no-till technique such as the reduction of soil erosion, soil moisture and organic matter retention, protection of groundwater quality, reduction of chemical runoff, and reduction of soil compaction. In 2000, with the help of the Environmental Trust, the Upper Loup purchased a 10 foot Great Plains no-till drill. The drill was kept very busy (drilled over 12,000 acres) and could not keep up with the demand so the NRD purchased another 10 foot drill in 2007. Both drills have been used in all of the eight counties of our district and to date have serviced more than 18,526 acres.

Several producers have been enquiring about a larger drill that could be rented. A larger drill would provide a couple of advantages. One, it would cut down on the amount of time each producer needed to have the drill allowing it to be used by more producers during peak planting times. Two, it would reduce the number of rounds it would take to drill, making the process more conservation friendly (reducing fuel usage and emissions). The 20 foot Haybuster no-till drill is expected to be here the first part of June. The new drill can be easily pulled behind a pickup. It does not have seed boxes for native seeds.


Notice of Public Hearing

There will be a Public Hearing at the Niobrara River Basin Alliance Board Meeting on Wednesday, March 19th, held at the Niobrara Lodge in Valentine. The Public Hearing will begin at 1PM Central Time.


Soil Testing—what is it all about?

Have you ever had your soil tested?  Should you?  Here are some good reasons why you should have a soil test performed.
1. Soil testing is an important diagnostic tool to evaluate nutrient imbalances and understand plant growth.   
2. Testing the soil provides a basis for intelligent application of fertilizer and lime. 
3. Testing also allows for growers and homeowners to maintain a soil pH in the optimum range (6.0-7.0), which keeps nutrients more available to the plant for growth. 
4. Protection of our environment for we cannot afford to pollute our surface and ground waters by indiscriminate application of phosphorous or nitrogen fertilizers, for example. 
5. Cost savings - Why apply what you don't need? Soil test results provide information about the soil's ability to supply nutrients to plants for adequate growth, and are the basis of deciding how much lime and fertilizer are needed.

When do I soil test?  Sampling can be done at any time, but late October or early November is usually preferable. Avoid sampling when the soil is very wet or recently limed or fertilized.

What tests are performed? The basic soil test results will tell you the pH of the soil, organic matter (nutrient holding capacity), available phosphorous (P), and available potassium (K).  The soil may also be tested for Nitrate (N), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), sulfur (S), boron (B), manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn).  

Who takes the soil samples?  Your local County Extension offices can instruct you on how to take samples yourself.  There are businesses that you can contact that will obtain the sample for you, one such group is your local Farmer’s Coop.

The Upper Loup Natural Resources District (ULNRD) understands the importance of soil testing and has a cost-share program to help land owners defray part of the costs associated with testing.  For more information or to obtain a cost-share application you can contact our office at 308-645-2250.